FOI Friday: Dodging magistrates, the race for Oxbridge, big cats and clearing up after gypsies

How many going to university? Some interesting data from the Western Mail, which used FOI to ask how many students from each of the towns in Wales had been enrolled at Oxford and Cambridge in recent years. In some parts of Wales, not a single student has attended Oxbridge for seven years. No shows atContinue reading “FOI Friday: Dodging magistrates, the race for Oxbridge, big cats and clearing up after gypsies”

Learning from #hyperlocal: An effective way of making councillors accountable

Up and down the country, the annual budget meetings are taking place at local councils. Town Hall budgets are being slashed due to government cuts with most councils having to make very difficult decisions. Central government has been quite good at passing the buck on the cuts – indeed, the fact local government is bearingContinue reading “Learning from #hyperlocal: An effective way of making councillors accountable”

Why the right of reply is essential to journalism – either in print or online

In the last week, two of my blog posts – both on very different areas of journalism – have prompted responses which, it turns out, contained a similar thread. One involved Prof Roy Greenslade, the other Simon Perry, from the Isle of Wight’s Ventnor Blog. Greenslade wrote a post on his blog in response toContinue reading “Why the right of reply is essential to journalism – either in print or online”

FOI Friday: 10 things we’ve learnt this week thanks to the Freedom of Information Act

Lying Parents School place appeals stories are always popular and controversial, and in recent years many councils have vowed to get tough on those who lie to get their children into good schools. But how many parents have been found to be lying? The Gloucestershire Echo used FOI to find out. Forced adoptions A goodContinue reading “FOI Friday: 10 things we’ve learnt this week thanks to the Freedom of Information Act”