If you think you’re reading or writing that bin fire nib every day, then it’s probably because you are

The only things certain in life, said Benjamin Franklin, are death and taxes.

For reporters on local and regional newspapers, you can probably add a third: bin fires.

For me, a duty reporter shift wasn’t a duty reporter shift at the Lancashire Evening Telegraph without one of the local fire stations sharing details of a bin fire, sometimes referred to as a refuse fire if they are being technical.

And now there appears to be proof that if you suspected you wrote a bin fire nib every day, you probably were.

This, via the Freedom of Information Act, from the South Wales Evening Post:

FIRE crews have dealt with a staggering 2,387 refuse fires across South West Wales during a period of less than four years, it has emerged.

Fire chiefs have issued a warning in light of the figures, saying incidents of arson, as well as being potentially deadly, are a drain on resources which can often be deployed more effectively elsewhere.

Statistics released under freedom of information laws show that between April 2011 and November this year 2,387 refuse fires – more than one a day – were recorded across Swansea, Neath Port Talbot and Carmarthenshire areas.

Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service have called on the public to help them in the fight against arson.

But what for the future of the bin fire nib? Nibs don’t really work online, even when packaged up with other nibs for a ‘news in brief round-up.’
And surely there’s only so much you can say about a bin fire nib – making it harder to lengthen it sufficently to catch the eye of Google, or write it in such as way as to sing on social.
I suspect for as long as there are local newsrooms ringing the fire station, there will be bin fires to report. And, thanks to FOI, we know for sure that we’ll probably be writing about them at least once a day.

 

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