Seen from afar: Tweets which made me think from #rethinkmedia

Birmingham at night….

Last week, Birmingham City University hosted ‘Rethink Media’. It’s always fascinating to follow conferences via Twitter, not least because it saves having to choose which sessions to follow if the organisers have gone for the many option approach.

Following the hashtag #rethinkmedia is never going to be as good as being in the room, although it does increase the chances of being closer to a power socket which you can call your own.

The upside of following a conference or event via Twitter is that you get to hear the opinions which often go through the heads of those in the audience but which don’t get shared during debates for many reasons. The downside is it can sometimes be hard to distinguish what is being said on the stage from the views of people in the audience.

Whether that’s too important, I’m not sure. However, I thought I’d try and stitch together some of the most interesting (to me) Tweets I saw from the event, most of which focus on social. The list isn’t meant to be a compilation of Tweets to document the whole day (you can find the live blog here), just some things which made me stop and think from afar:

Buzzfeed’s going after Video, it just doesn’t know where it will go with it yet:

But it has an idea on what works already:

An attempt to work out the most shareable words in headlines (click the read, rather than the graphic):

Why do people share on Social Media? A question all newsrooms should explore:

Readers are creatures of habit, even online:

Stories work better if you think about different social media platforms, rather than just social itself:

If 80% of content online is UGC, then surely that’s the proof that it’s a bigger risk to ignore it than to embrace it?

Random acts of digital aren’t good (but often they sound good):

An interesting stat which shows how far traditional brands can go:

The most simple graphics are often the most effective – How platform use changes during the day:

The content readers often respond to are often the ones which journalists find easy to criticise (but I would say that, because I’ve seen the engagement stats and page views behind the content Ross talks about here): 

And perhaps the most important message for newsrooms seeking to be great at social:

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